The U.S. Power Sector Big Concerns & Big Opportunity Infographics

Dec 6, 2013     No Comments    Posted under: Infographics




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The U.S. electric grid is facing a slough of future challenges, and the future of the industry is at stake if these issues aren’t resolved.

These issues probably aren’t what you think: they’re facing an industry-wide shortage of power personnel; from electrical engineers to professors teaching at Universities across the country.

The industry is facing a demographic cliff, with the current average age of the power sector workforce at 50 years old.  At the current rate, 52% of skilled engineers and technicians will need to be replaced in the next 10 years.  The problem?  There is also a lack of new graduate engineers in the US, and a decreasing number of electrial engineers enrolling and graduating from programs.

The U.S. Power Sector Big Concerns & Big Opportunity Infographics



The U.S. Power Sector Big Concerns & Big Opportunity Infographics



 

Even with the challenges facing the industry, there is a major upside.  The energy sector presents some of the best careers opportunities out of any industry, with high job growth and demand.  In the next 10 years alone it is estimated that there will be a 15% to 20% growth in demand for nuclear and petroleum engineers.

As green and renewable energy continues to grow, so will the job opportunity.  President Obama has noted that by 2035, 80% of America’s electricity will come from clean energy sources.  With that said, the energy sector will continue to be a hotbed of opportunity for new graduates.

To see the original infographic, created by the New Jersey Institute of Technology’s Online Master of Science in Electrical Engineering program, click here.

Andrew Deen is a higher education expert and a fan of all things related to higher education.  Connect with him @andrewdeen14.

Author: nKlik Inc.

Founder of Pick Analysis. He likes to surf around the web and explore contents related to his interest. You can follow his Social Network accounts at Twitter and .

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